Decision Review System needs fine-tuning: Broad

Updated: 14 December 2009 10:46 IST

ICC match referee Chris Broad has come out in support of the controversial Decision Review System but favours fine-tuning of the technology.

Decision Review System needs fine-tuning: Broad

Melbourne:

International Cricket Council match referee Chris Broad has come out in support of the controversial Decision Review System but favours fine-tuning of the technology.

While supporting the use of technology, Broad, who is refereeing the current Test series between Australia and the West Indies, said more work needs to be done to improve the system.

"This is start of the process. There are discussions that still need to be had. A little bit of fine-tuning here and there, but any new tool that comes into cricket takes a while for everyone to understand the way forward. There are more processes to be put in place. Once it all settles down I think it will be considered part and parcel of the game," Broad said.

"We've got to find out the best way of using this technology and for the moment this is the way it's been decided," he added.

The Englishman termed the introduction of DRS as a fundamental change in cricket but said if technology helps in improving umpiring standard he is all for it.

"It's been said before that questioning an umpire's decision is always going to be difficult no matter who does it. We've all been brought up to play this wonderful game where the umpire is always right. Now it's a fundamental change in the game of cricket.

"But, the use of technology is long overdue. We've got to try and get technology used properly in cricket, particularly if it's picking up flaws in umpiring decisions. I am in favour of using technology," Broad told ABC radio.

He though conceded that the system was hampered by the cost of technology, particularly hotspot, which can show if the ball has hit the edge of the bat if the angles are right.

"We're a couple of cameras short in this series between Australia and the West Indies. It's a matter of finding people to front up to pay for the technology because it's not cheap. At the moment the hot spot device is prevalent in Australia and England but there aren't too many other countries who have that technology," he said.

"It's a question of finding a way of funding those technical advancements in every country," he added.

Cash-rich India refused to apply the system in the Test series against Sri Lanka due to the cost.

Topics : Cricket Sreesanth
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