Are BCCI curbs enough to check corruption in CLT20?

Updated: 06 September 2013 15:38 IST

Evils like spot and match-fixing have hounded cricket for decades. Surprisingly, it is now that this Board seems to have woken up to the harsh realities. The proposals as set out by interim chief Jagmohan Dalmiya are stern but they also make me question why it took so long for these measures to see the light of day.

The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) has unanimously adopted a five-point proposal to curb corruption in Champions League T20. After suffering grave embarrassment due to alleged spot-fixing in the Indian Premier League this year, the world's richest cricket board seems to be in no mood to leave the sport to the 'good intentions' of cricketers.

Evils like spot and match-fixing have hounded cricket for decades. Surprisingly, it is now that this Board seems to have woken up to the harsh realities. The proposals as set out by interim chief Jagmohan Dalmiya are stern but they also make me question why it took so long for these measures to see the light of day.

Amongst the main points, the suggestions include appointing Anti-Corruption Security Unit (ASCU) officials with each team. It also mandates security officials to be present and a 'code of conduct' in the dug-out. While these may or may not completely weed out the menace of cricket fixing, it will surely stem it's growth. Why then were these not put into place earlier, considering T20 cricket has existed for several years now and malpractices, generally, have been around for even longer?

Better late than never is an excuse that may be presented in all its splendor but the fact is that cricket could have been in a much better spot today, if only these measures were implemented earlier. Who knows, even Sreesanth - innocent until proven guilty of course, could have still been playing instead of cursing his wretched towel!

Having said that, not all the proposals to curb corruption among players as suggested by Dalmiya, make sense. In fact, some spelt out by the 73-year-old appear out-rightly regressive. Measures like providing current mobile numbers and seeking permission from the team manager to receive hotel calls are solutions which just cannot be wholly implemented. How difficult will it be for a player with ulterior motives to find another phone, another sim card, another voice chat feature, another communication app, another fake email account?

For all its wealth, influence and prowess, I sincerely hope BCCI has an extensive ethical hacking system to check leaks!

Apart from form and strategies then, players this Champions League T20 will have a lot to watch out for and do or not do (depending on the proposals) as they seek their character certificates from custodians of cricket - fans, ICC, BCCI and the law of the land.

Topics : Cricket Champions League Twenty20 2013 Champions League Twenty20, 2011 Board of Control for Cricket in India
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