The cricketing world reacts to decision on DRS

Updated: 27 June 2011 20:41 IST

The deadlock regarding the use of Decision Review System (DRS) between the International Cricket Council (ICC) and the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) finally seems to have been resolved with a modified version being made mandatory on Monday.

The cricketing world reacts to decision on DRS

New Delhi:

The deadlock regarding the use of Decision Review System (DRS) between the International Cricket Council (ICC) and the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) finally seems to have been resolved with a modified version being made mandatory on Monday.


In the run-up to the ICC's chief executives' meeting in Hong Kong, currently underway, former players as well as current crop of stars raised their support and objection in varying degrees to the use of technology in the sport, which is how  DRS can be best explained in its simplest form. (Read: DRS explained)

While New Zealand's Martin Crowe was the latest to join the camp of DRS supporters, calling it 'a pretty thing,' the final decision was made with the ICC Chief Executive Haroon Lorgat saying that the verdict was reached to strengthen the sport and it's three formats. (Read: Crowe slams ICC for stalling DRS)

The formidable adversary of DRS - the Indian Cricket Board too, softened its stance saying that it has never been averse to the idea of embracing technology in the sport. "The BCCI has always expressed its willingness to embrace technology, for the betterment of the game. However, the current ball-tracking technology, on which the DRS system is based, is not acceptable to the Board," BCCI Secretary N Srinivasan said in a statement. His concerns with the specific technology has been addressed to by the ICC and it has not been included in the mandatory DRS giving it it's modified character. (Read: BCCI reacts)

Some others like former New Zealand skipper Stephan Fleming have already termed the modified DRS as 'a compromise made by the ICC.' Fleming welcomed the use of Hot spot and Snickometer being made mandatory in Tests and ODI but said that it has to be comprehensive. "This is a compromise formula by the ICC since all countries were not totally convinced with the technology. Some aspects of the technology are not acceptable in current form so the ICC had to make some compromise. The technology is there to get rid of the poor decisions and we have to make sure that it is really done," he said. (Read: Decision is a compromise, says Fleming)


The decision to implement DRS for matches during India's tour to England has had English cricketers re-acting as well. While some cricketers like fast-bowler Chris Tremlett had said he was stumped by India's opposition to the decision, England's one-day captain has welcomed Monday's decision. "I believe DRS helps get more right decisions, which is the most important thing. What we need is players getting the right decisions, whether they are in or out, and that is the end of the matter," he said. (Read: Cook puts his faith in reviews)

Spinner Graeme Swann had earlier said that India's veto on DRS can back-fire in the English tour but with the system all set to make its presence felt in the 4 Tests and 5 ODIs, his view has now been deemed invalid, albeit a modified version being made mandatory.



Topics : Pakistan South Africa Graeme Swann Cricket Alastair Cook Haroon Lorgat Stephen Fleming
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