The Ashes: Australia dumps Hot-Spot for return leg Down Under

Updated: 09 October 2013 18:14 IST

During the Ashes played in England, there were a lot of controversial decisions and accusations surrounding DRS and Hot Spot - particularly Usman Khawaja's dismissal at Old Trafford and the 'silicone tape' controversy.

The Ashes: Australia dumps Hot-Spot for return leg Down Under

Australia's Ashes broadcaster Channel Nine has scrapped the Hot Spot for the return series Down Under.

In an exclusive report in the The Syndey Morning Herald, Hot Spot's Australian inventor Warren Brennan confirmed that the decision-review device, which uses heat readings to analyse whether there has been contact between the ball and the bat and pads, would be unavailable for the much-awaited series.

"It's their decision and that's what's been communicated to us. As far as I'm concerned, it is final," Brennan said. "We're just moving on with things. Channel Nine have got a new deal with Cricket Australia which I know has cost them a lot more money. I gather there had to be some restructuring of costs."

This means that the Decision Review System will now include - ball-tracking (Hawk-eye), stump microphones and slow motion replays. What impact it has on the outcome of the decisions will be known when the teams begin their battle.

Brennan criticised Channel Nine for their 'behaviour', saying that the broadcasters never engaged with them before taking such a drastic step.

"I don't have a beef with Channel Nine," Brennan said. "The disappointing thing for us is that Cricket Australia didn't engage at all with us to try and come on board and help with this situation. They just said, 'No, it's got nothing to do with us. It's Channel Nine's responsibility'. What's disappointing is we work in four countries at the moment - well, until recently."

Incidentally, it was Channel Nine television in Australia that 'broke' the story, while the Ashes was on in England, that Hot Spot was failing to detect edges hitting bats because of batsmen applying 'silicone tape' - a practice permitted by the laws of cricket.

Nine did not provide sources and gave no details of whether the Australian or England batsmen may have been using the tape to fool Hot Spot, which uses thermal cameras to see if a batsman has hit the ball, either with his bat or pad.

But it suggested both sides were under suspicion.

That matter, though, died down soon with the teams denying any wrongdoing and the International Cricket Council not pursuing the case. Star England batsman Kevin Pietersen also spoke vehemently against the speculation.

During the England Ashes, Australia also demanded an explanation from the International Cricket Council about how umpires arrived at a decision to give Usman Khawaja caught behind on the opening day of the third Test at Old Trafford.

Third umpire Kumar Dharmasena upheld an on-field call on Thursday, despite replay technology failing to provide any evidence that Khawaja touched the ball with his bat.

(With agency inputs)

Topics : Cricket South Africa Pakistan England Australia Joe Root Kevin Pietersen Glenn McGrath Shane Watson Mickey Arthur
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