Watch: Cricketer Penalised For 'Fake Fielding' Under New ICC Rules

Updated: 30 September 2017 09:42 IST

According to the MCC's new Law 41.5: "it is unfair for any fielder wilfully to attempt, by word or action, to distract, deceive or obstruct either batsman after the striker has received the ball."

Watch: Cricketer Penalised For 'Fake Fielding' Under New ICC Rules
The law against 'fake fielding' was broken within 24 hours of its introduction globally. © YouTube

Queensland fielder Marnus Labuschagne became the first cricketer to breach the new regulations of 'fake fielding' since the International Cricket Council (ICC) implemented the changed rules. The incident took place during a JLT One-Day Cup (domestic limited overs tournament of Australia) match between Queensland Bulls and Cricket Australia XI. Labuschagne dived and tried to stop the ball hit by Cricket Australia XI batsman Param Uppal, but missed it completely. He tried to fool the batsman by faking a throw.

With this law-breaking on-field reaction from Labuschagne, Queensland Bulls were penalised 5 runs. The cricket law was broken within 24 hours of its introduction globally.

According to the MCC's new Law 41.5: "it is unfair for any fielder willfully to attempt, by word or action, to distract, deceive or obstruct either batsman after the striker has received the ball."

The umpires have the discretion to award five penalty runs if they determine that such deception is wilful.

Summarising the Law changes, the MCC stated specifically that mock fielding, "where a fielder feigns to field the ball and/or feigns to throw a non-existent ball in an attempt to prevent the batsmen running", was regarded as unfair and was a target of this new Law.

Under new rules effective from Thursday, cricket players can be -- like in football -- ordered off the field if they commit major offences.

Threatening to assault an umpire, making inappropriate and deliberate physical contact with an umpire, physically assaulting a player or any other person and committing any other act of violence will be deemed Level 4 offence -- warranting marching orders.

A player can now be sent off the field for the rest of the match if a Level 4 offence is committed. Level 1 to 3 offences will continue to be dealt with under the ICC Code of Conduct.Code of Conduct.

Topics : Cricket International Cricket Council
Highlights
  • Team penalised 5 runs after player 'fake fields'
  • This is the first time a player has been penalised for 'fake fielding'
  • New rules came into effect on Thursday
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