Sri Lanka's Galle Stadium Could Be Demolished To Save 17th Century Dutch Fort

Updated: 20 July 2018 15:46 IST

The English captured Galle in 1796, but did not make any significant alterations to the structures in the walled city. It is now a key tourist attraction.

Sri Lanka
The Galle stadium was largely destroyed by the horrific tsunami which struck the region in December 2004. © AFP

Rated as one of the most picturesque cricket grounds in the world, Sri Lanka's Galle International Stadium could be demolished because its pavilion stand violated heritage laws protecting a 17th-century Dutch fort, the government said on Friday. The iconic stadium, which was established in 1984, is cornered on two sides by the ocean and is overseen by the Dutch fort. After making its Test debut in 1998, the ground was largely destroyed by the horrific tsunami which struck the region in December 2004.

Cultural Affairs Minister Wijeyadasa Rajapakshe told parliament the fort risked losing UNESCO World Heritage status because of unauthorised construction, including the 500-seat pavilion.

"We have to decide if we want to remain in the World Heritage list or keep the pavilion," Rajapakshe said.

Rajapkshe noted however that the government plans to build another stadium in Galle, 115 kilometers (72 miles) south of Colombo. "We could have another cricket grounds in Galle soon," he added.

The Galle surface is traditionally spin friendly and has been a lucky venue for the national team. Sri Lanka has won a majority of matches played there since 1998. 

Last week, they won the first Test against South Africa by 278 runs with two days to spare.

"There will be no immediate demolition of the Galle Stadium," Sports Minister Faiszer Musthapha said. 

"We want to maintain the World Heritage status for the fort. We will work out an alternative" for the cricket stadium, he added.

Official sources said a November Test match against England could be the final international at the current Galle stadium.

Souther Development Minister Sagala Ratnayaka noted that the UNESCO did not object to the cricket grounds, but wanted unauthorised structures around it removed, including the two-storey pavilion. 

The building named after former president Mahinda Rajapakse obstructs the view of the fort from the main Galle road.

The fort was initially built by the Portuguese who colonised the island in 1505. However, many of the buildings at the site were built by the Dutch who drove out the Portuguese in 1640.

The English captured Galle in 1796, but did not make any significant alterations to the structures in the walled city. It is now a key tourist attraction.

(With AFP Inputs)

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Topics : Sri Lanka Cricket Team Cricket
Highlights
  • Galle is cornered on two sides by the ocean and is overseen by the fort
  • The Dutch fort risked losing UNESCO World Heritage status
  • The fort was built by the Portuguese who colonised the island in 1505
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