Vishwanathan Anand draws first blood

Updated: 18 October 2008 16:15 IST

Viswanathan Anand crashed through the defences of Vladimir Kramnik of Russia in the third game of the world championship at art and exhibition hall.

Vishwanathan Anand draws first blood

Bonn, Germany:

World Champion Viswanathan Anand crashed through the defences of Vladimir Kramnik of Russia in the third game of the world championship at art and exhibition hall.

Winning with black, Anand now leads the 12-game match 2-1 with nine games to come and will now play white in the fourth game on Saturday.

Kramnik was simply unnerved by the turn of events and it was clearly visible the way he handled the final part of the game.

Anand stuck to his guns, employing the Slav defense for the second time in the match. Kramnik, who had gauged with a rather insipid play in the first game of the match, had other ideas this time around as he went for an age-old setup, known to have wild complexities.

The opening did not give much for Kramnik as Anand clearly emerged as the better prepared. The Russian was glued to his chair in the early stages while Anand was seen blitzing out the moves in far quicker time.

As is typical of the opening, the players reached a fairly unbalanced position with white having a couple of passed pawns on the queen side while black had his share of counter-play in form of piece activity.

It was only on the 19th move that Anand had to think for a reply, a clear indication that the Indian ace was in his preparation till that point.

Already close to 90 minutes had passed since the start at this stage and Anand had a huge lead on time, having spent little over 10 minutes against Kramniks 85 minutes.

The Russian was left with just 45 minutes at this point but here onwards, Anand spent a lot of time.

It was careful planning, brilliantly executed with a fine king side attack that netted Anand the full point. The Indian ace thought a long time and even fell behind on the clock for some time but by then, everything was under control.

With pressure building, Kramnik lost control of the position on the 33rd move and played a blunder. Even though Anand did not draw the curtains immediately, the end was quite near fromt his point onwards.

Kramnik lost his queen once the avalanche of black pieces came firing at his king and the rest was easy pickings for Anand. For the record, the longest game of the match thus far lasted 41 moves.



Topics : Chess
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