Top spot: Anand denies racism

Updated: 04 April 2007 07:09 IST

The chess wizard said there must have been some "genuine technical problem" behind FIDE's initial decision.

Top spot: Anand denies racism

Chennai:

World number one Viswanathan Anand on Tuesday said he did not think racism was a factor in the international chess federation's (FIDE) initial decision not to give him the top ranking.

He also indicated he would focus more on playing "good and solid" chess to retain his spot.

The chess wizard said there must have been some "genuine technical problem" behind FIDE's initial decision.

"I do not want to look at such things with a critical view but hope that FIDE will stick to its decision to announce the events rated and ranking points well in advance," Anand told PTI from Madrid in Spain.

Anand won the Linares tournament in Spain last month, which pushed him to the top in world rankings. But FIDE's list, updated quarterly, showed on April 1 Veselin Topalov of Bulgaria ahead of Anand by 13 points.

The game's world governing body did not included points gained by Anand in Linares, claiming that the tournament ended on Mar 10, well after the cut-off date of Feb 28.

But FIDE was forced to correct the list and make the Indian Grandmaster as the number one following sharp criticism by All India Chess Federation (AICF) and chess fans from around the globe.

Anand said he was sure he would be number one in the April list. "But there was some excitement, with FIDE deciding otherwise (to include Linares in July list)."

"Technically speaking, points difference between Topalov and me is small. I know I have to play well to remain at the top and do not want to worry too much. I will concentrate on playing good and solid chess."

Topics : Chess
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