Negi holds Khalifman

Updated: 27 August 2007 07:08 IST

Parimarjan Negi held former World champion Alexander Khalifman of Russia in the fourth round of the NH Chess tournament at Amsterdam.

Negi holds Khalifman

Amsterdam:

World's youngest Grandmaster Parimarjan Negi held former World champion Alexander Khalifman of Russia in the fourth round of the NH Chess tournament at Amsterdam.

After a loss in the previous game against Artur Jussopow of Germany, Negi, who is representing Rising Stars here against an 'Experience' team, was quite content with the 19-move draw with white pieces.

Meanwhile, aided by a brilliant performance from Dutch youngster Daniel Stellwagen who crushed Ljubomir Ljubojevic of Serbia, the Rising Stars team further enhanced their lead over their Experienced rivals.

After the fourth round of this 50-games match the score now reads 11.5-8.5 in the favour of the young team and it seems they are well on their way to another emphatic victory after last year's triumph.

Apart from Stellwagen, top seeded Rising Star Sergey Karjakin of Ukraine was the other winner of the day when he outwitted Predrag Nikolic of Bosnia while another rising star Jam Smeets went down to Jussopow from a commanding position.

The other game of the day between Ivan Cheparinov of Bulgaria and Alexander Beliavsky of Slovenia ended in a draw.

Negi had very little to do with white against Khalifman who employed the Sicilian Dragon. The Indian played a side variation and the position was nearly balanced when the players repeated moves and signed peace.

For Khalifman this was fourth draw in succession while for Negi this was third draw besides the only loss he suffered in previous round.



Topics : Chess
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