Chess family at Delhi tournament

Updated: 22 March 2007 06:37 IST

The Parsvanath Chess tournament in the capital last month had a three-way participation from the Negi family - a family that literally thrives on chess.

Chess family at Delhi tournament

New Delhi:

The Parsvanath Chess tournament in the capital last month had a three-way participation from the Negi family - a family that literally thrives on chess. Part-time coach Virender Singh Negi and son Anirudh may not have done exceptionally well at this tournament but the two hope to use this experience to improve their game. But it all started at the Negi household, grandfather Kuwar Singh Negi. Truly a classic case of three generations coming together for one common passion, Chess For the 81-year-old grandfather, the day begins and ends with chess whether it's in his capacity as the Secretary of the Chess Association of Uttarakhand, playing chess with his family at home or then poring over books on the game. He hopes to provide his 12-year-old grandson with some stiff competition to prepare him for future tournaments and more importantly be a catalyst in his journey to becoming a grandmaster. "They play good chess but not to the level of grandmasters, we want him to come upto to that level. They are steady, in sometime they may succeed," said Kuwar Singh Negi. "I want to become a good player like them and that's why I play with them and try to beat them as well, this is the biggest thing for me and my main inspiration," said Anirudh. Not much success Anirudh who started playing at the age of seven hasn't had much success yet. The Delhi under 11 champion in 2003, Anirudh only won the inter-school zonal competition last year. But with all the practice at home, father Virender hopes that things will change for the seventh standard student. "The biggest advantage is of getting playing practice,if I coach my son, he can implement things on his grandfather and can play a lot of games and improve, he gets different ideas, my father has a different style of playing, I have a different style and so does my son, it feels good," said Virender Negi. The three may have different playing styles and different approaches but have one common goal - to constantly improve, evolve and hopefully become a name that's synonymous with chess in India.

Topics : Chess
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